May I remind you all that this is a real picture of our sun!? This is incredible. I would love to see other stars like this one day. Imagine how a red supergiant would look, perhaps Betelgeuse that has extreme solar winds. It sheds an entire sun’s worth of mass every ten thousand years. It’s total mass can’t even be calculated precisely because its mass is always fluctuating! Betelgeuse will not live much longer, perhaps less than 10 million years. A sharp contrast to our sun, which due to its much smaller size, will live for close to 4 billion years more.

 astrodidact:

A Solar Filament Erupts 

Image Credit: NASA’s GSFC,SDO AIA Team

Explanation: What’s happened to our Sun? Nothing very unusual — it just threw a filament. At the end of last month, a long standing solar filament suddenly erupted into space producing an energetic Coronal Mass Ejection (CME). The filament had been held up for days by the Sun’s ever changing magnetic field and the timing of the eruption was unexpected. Watched closely by the Sun-orbiting Solar Dynamics Observatory, the resulting explosion shot electrons and ions into the Solar System, some of which arrived at Earth three days later and impacted Earth’s magnetosphere, causing visible aurorae. Loops of plasma surrounding an active region can be seen above the erupting filament in the ultraviolet image. If you missed this auroral display please do not despair — over the next two years our Sun will be experiencing a solar maximum of activity which promises to produce more CMEs that induce more Earthly auroras.
May I remind you all that this is a real picture of our sun!? This is incredible. I would love to see other stars like this one day. Imagine how a red supergiant would look, perhaps Betelgeuse that has extreme solar winds. It sheds an entire sun’s worth of mass every ten thousand years. It’s total mass can’t even be calculated precisely because its mass is always fluctuating! Betelgeuse will not live much longer, perhaps less than 10 million years. A sharp contrast to our sun, which due to its much smaller size, will live for close to 4 billion years more.

astrodidact:

A Solar Filament Erupts

Image Credit: NASA’s GSFC,SDO AIA Team

Explanation: What’s happened to our Sun? Nothing very unusual — it just threw a filament. At the end of last month, a long standing solar filament suddenly erupted into space producing an energetic Coronal Mass Ejection (CME). The filament had been held up for days by the Sun’s ever changing magnetic field and the timing of the eruption was unexpected. Watched closely by the Sun-orbiting Solar Dynamics Observatory, the resulting explosion shot electrons and ions into the Solar System, some of which arrived at Earth three days later and impacted Earth’s magnetosphere, causing visible aurorae. Loops of plasma surrounding an active region can be seen above the erupting filament in the ultraviolet image. If you missed this auroral display please do not despair — over the next two years our Sun will be experiencing a solar maximum of activity which promises to produce more CMEs that induce more Earthly auroras.

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Posted on Monday, 17 September
Reblogged from: astrodidact
Posted by: astrodidact
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    May I remind you all that this is a real picture of our sun!? This is incredible. I would love to see other stars like...
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