Astronomers have found the first direct evidence of cosmic inflation, the theorized dramatic expansion of the universe that put the “bang” in the Big Bang 13.8 billion years ago, new research suggests. via All Science, All the Time/fb
If it holds up, the landmark discovery — which also confirms the existence of hypothesized ripples in space-time known as gravitational waves — would give researchers a much better understanding of the Big Bang and its immediate aftermath.

"If it is confirmed, then it would be the most important discovery since the discovery, I think, that the expansion of the universe is accelerating," Harvard astronomer Avi Loeb, who is not a member of the study team, told Space.com, comparing the finding to a 1998 observation that opened the window on mysterious dark energy and won three researchers the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics.
A team led by John Kovac, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, is announcing the results today (March 17), unveiling two manuscripts that have not yet been submitted to peer-reviewed journals. Kovac’s team will also discuss the results in a news conference today at 12 p.m. EDT (1600 GMT)
http://www.space.com/25078-universe-inflation-gravitational-waves-discovery.html

Astronomers have found the first direct evidence of cosmic inflation, the theorized dramatic expansion of the universe that put the “bang” in the Big Bang 13.8 billion years ago, new research suggests. via All Science, All the Time/fb

If it holds up, the landmark discovery — which also confirms the existence of hypothesized ripples in space-time known as gravitational waves — would give researchers a much better understanding of the Big Bang and its immediate aftermath.

"If it is confirmed, then it would be the most important discovery since the discovery, I think, that the expansion of the universe is accelerating," Harvard astronomer Avi Loeb, who is not a member of the study team, told Space.com, comparing the finding to a 1998 observation that opened the window on mysterious dark energy and won three researchers the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics.

A team led by John Kovac, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, is announcing the results today (March 17), unveiling two manuscripts that have not yet been submitted to peer-reviewed journals. Kovac’s team will also discuss the results in a news conference today at 12 p.m. EDT (1600 GMT)

http://www.space.com/25078-universe-inflation-gravitational-waves-discovery.html

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Posted on Monday, 17 March
Tagged as: science Astronomy
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